← Older posts

Overuse Injuries of the Lower Extremity

Posted on by Dr.Mike
Overuse Injuries of the Lower Extremity
For Healthcare Professionals
August 2018
Research Studies
Practical
Daily activities, including work and exercise, expose the joints, muscles and connective tissues to high levels of stress, leading
to lower extremity overuse injuries. Many short-hand terms have been used to describe these conditions, but they’re all
caused by the same thing: repetitive stress. As a Chiropractor, you can examine your patient’s feet for evidence of abnormal
biomechanics and an altered gait and offer them long-term support with custom-made, flexible Stabilizing Orthotics, like
those offered by Foot Levelers.
To categorize overuse injuries, look over Table 1, a compendium of potentially affected tissues and the causes and conditions
that encompass the large domain of overload injuries. Note that virtually all of the conditions listed in the table have been
directly correlated with abnormal foot biomechanics.
1
Bodily Tissue Affected
Tissues/Joints
Causes
Conditions
Muscles
Repetitive/excessive strain strengthens or breaks
down muscles.
Shin splints, groin strains, piriformis strains, pulled hamstrings,
fascia lata tightness, compartment syndromes, tibialis (post &
ant.) strains, calf strains, patellar tracking problems
Tendons
Frequent movement can lead to an inflammatory
response (tendinitis or “tendinosis”).
2
Achilles tendinitis, peroneal tendinitis, patellar tendinitis
(“jumper’s knee”), iliotibial band syndrome
Ligaments/Fascia
Frequent overloading tightens ligaments, causing
them to eventually fail.
Plantar fasciitis, spring ligament sprains, hip joint capsulitis,
compartment syndromes, trochanteric bursitis, anterior
cruciate ligment injuries
Bones
Repetitive/excessive strain can cause a stress
reaction and, eventually, stress fracture in as little as
two weeks in the hip and upper leg.
Stress reaction, bone marrow edema, stress fractures of the
calcaneus, metatarsals, tarsals, tibia, femur, sesamoiditis, tibial
periostitis, calcaneal periostitis (heel spurs)
Joints
Repetitive loading with poor shock absorption can
affect the weight-bearing and patellofemoral joints.
3,4
Chondromalacia patellae, degenerative joint disease of the
ankle, knee and/or hip joint, osteoarthritis
Nerves
Repetitive irritation can lead to an overgrowth of
protective connective tissue.
Morton’s (interdigital) neuromas, tarsal tunnel syndromes,
nerve entrapments of lateral plantar or medial calcaneal nerves
Table 1. Overuse injuries of the lower extremity
Overuse/Microtrauma
The conditions listed in Table 1 are all due to excessive
and/or repetitive motion and result in microtrauma injuries,
in which tissues fail because the body is unable to repair
quickly enough. The various causes of overuse injuries
are best categorized into intrinsic and extrinsic factors
(Table 2) and should be addressed immediately.
5
Extrinsic Factors
Intrinsic Factors
Exercise program (intensity)
Muscle imbalance
Exercise/work environment (surfaces)
Structural misalignment
Equipment (shoes)
Joint dysfunction
Table 2. Factors that cause overuse injuries
Research Studies
Practical
Analysis of Extrinsic and Intrinsic Factors
Extrinsic and intrinsic factors are closely intertwined and contribute to
most lower extremity overuse injuries.
For example, scientists found that walking at a normal pace produces
around 5 Gs of force on the foot and ankle and sends a ve ry rapid shock
wave (a “transient”) up through the spine with each step (Fig. 2). Within 10
milliseconds of the heel striking the ground (faster than we can consciously
respond), the scientists recorded a .5 G impact at the skull,  which is the
equivalent of a 160-pound man being hit in the head by 80 pounds with
each step. Running multiplies this effect by about 3 times (the Rule of
Three).   Also, if the foot goes too far into pronation, or stays too supinated,
the effects are amplified: “A high-arched [cavus] foot with limited range
of motion . . . and [a] hypermobile flat foot . . . [attenuate shock poorly]
because of its function near the end of the range of motion.”
Orthotic Support
Chiropractic adjustments and exercising can be helpful when it comes to
treating overuse injuries, but Stabilizing Orthotics are often necessary for long-
term support. Orthotics utilize a pronation wedge, viscoelastic materials and
the 3 Arch Advantage
to provide unmatched support:
Absorb heel strike impact and reduces the force on the joints
Reduce pronation by decreasing medial rotation to the knees and spine
Improve alignment and mobility of the arches to reduce muscle stretching
Provide accurate proprioception for better balance and alignment
Support the medial arch and reduces calcaneal eversion
References
1.
Hartley A.
Practical Joint Assessment: A Sports Medicine Manual
. St. Louis: Mosby YearBook; 1991:571.
2.
Khan KM et al. Overuse tendinosis, not tendinitis, part 1: a new paradigm for a difficult clinical problem.
Phys & Sportsmed
2000; 28:38-48.
3.
Radin EL et al. Mechanical determinants of osteoarthrosis.
Sem Arth Rheum
1991; 21:12-21.
4.
Seedhom B et al. Mechanical factors and patellofemoral osteoarthritis.
Ann Rheum Dis
1979; 38:307-316.
5.
Lysholm J, Wiklander J. Injuries in runners.
Am J Sports Med
1987; 15:168-171.
6.
Subotnick SI, ed.
Sports Medicine of the Lower Extremity
. New York: Churchill Livingstone; 1989:193.
7.
Light LH, McLellan GE, Klenerman L. Skeletal transients on heel strike in normal walking with different footwear.
J Biomech
1980; 13:477-480.
8.
Subotnick SI, ed.
Sports Medicine of the Lower Extremity
. New York: Churchill Livingston; 1989:67.
9.
Subotnick SI. Forces acting on the lower extremity. In:
Sports Medicin of the Lower Extremity
. New York: Churchill Livingston;
Posted in Blog | Tagged | Comments Off on Overuse Injuries of the Lower Extremity

Tips for a Healthy Summer Vacation

Posted on by Dr.Mike
With summer here, many people are making plans to travel to far-off locations for some much-needed relaxation or family fun. However, traveling can be rough on the body; long hours in a car or on an airplane can leave you stressed, tired, stiff and sore.
One of the biggest insults to your system from prolonged sitting is the buildup of pressure in the blood vessels in your lower legs. Contracting and relaxing the muscles helps the blood flow properly.
The American Chiropractic Association offers the following tips to help alleviate the aches and strains associated with travel:
Warm Up, Cool Down
Treat travel like an athletic event. Warm up before settling into a car or plane, and cool down once you reach your destination. Take a brisk walk to stretch your hamstring and calf muscles.
Tips for Airplane Travel
· Stand up straight and feel the normal “S” curve of your spine. Then use rolled-up pillows or blankets to maintain that curve when you sit in your seat. Tuck a pillow behind your back and just above the beltline and lay another pillow across the gap between your neck and the headrest. If the seat is hollowed from wear, use folded blankets to raise your buttocks a little.
· Check all bags heavier than 5 to 10 percent of your body weight. Overhead lifting of any significant amount of weight should be avoided to reduce the risk of pain in the lower back or neck. While lifting your bags, stand right in front of the overhead compartment so the spine is not rotated. Do not lift your bags over your head or turn or twist your head and neck in the process.
· While seated, vary your position occasionally to improve circulation and avoid leg cramps. Massage legs and calves. Bring your legs in, and move your knees up and down. Prop your legs up on a book or a bag under your seat.
Tips for Car Travel
· Adjust the seat so you are as close to the steering wheel as comfortably possible. Your knees should be slightly higher than your hips. Place four fingers behind the back of your thigh closest to your knee. If you cannot easily slide your fingers in and out of that space, you need to re-adjust your seat.
· Consider a back support. Using a support may reduce the incidence of low-back strain and pain. The widest part of the support should be between the bottom of your rib cage and your waistline.
· Exercise your legs while driving to reduce the risk of any swelling, fatigue or discomfort. Open your toes as wide as you can, and count to 10. Count to five while you tighten your calf muscles, then your thigh muscles, then your gluteal muscles. Roll your shoulders forward and back, making sure to keep your hands on the steering wheel and your eyes on the road.
· To minimize arm and hand tension while driving, hold the steering wheel at approximately 3 o’clock and 7 o’clock, periodically switching to 10 o’clock and 5 o’clock.
Posted in Blog | Comments Off on Tips for a Healthy Summer Vacation

SPRING SHOVELING?

Posted on by Dr.Mike

Shoveling in 2018 may not be just for winter. March may go out with a roar!

 

February, and maybe March, bring lots of snow for most of the country and with it comes the dreaded task of snow removal. Shoveling your driveway is already a hassle; don’t let it be a pain in the neck and back, too. The American Chiropractic Association suggests the following tips to help you avoid muscle strain and other injuries when shoveling:

  • Use a lightweight, ergonomically-designed shovel.
  • If possible, push the snow aside instead of lifting. If you need to lift, bend your knees, allowing the muscles of your legs and arms to do the work instead of your back.
  • Do not throw snow over your shoulder or to the side. This requires twisting or turning motions that can cause injury.
  • Take frequent breaks – a fatigued body asks for injury.
  • Stop immediately and seek medical attention if you feel faint, dizzy or have chest pain.

If after a few days you continue to feel soreness or muscle strain, it may be time to visit your local chiropractic office.

 

Posted in Back, Blog, Health, Joints, Neck, Pain, Winter Health | Tagged , , | Comments Off on SPRING SHOVELING?

Holiday Shopping Tips

Posted on by Dr.Mike

The day after Thanksgiving is a milestone of sorts in America. It reminds us of just how quickly the year has gone by and how close we are to the holiday season. This realization—coupled with the fabulous sales at major department stores and malls everywhere—helps make the day after Thanksgiving our biggest shopping day of the year. And until we flip the calendar over to a new year, the chaos just doesn’t let up.

“Our bodies have the capacity to do a little more than we normally do,” says Dr. Scott Bautch, a member of the American Chiropractic Association’s (ACA) Council on Occupational Health. “But our bodies do not adapt very well to doing a lot more than we normally do. Since the added demands of this season can stress the capacity of our bodies, we need to do everything we can to help ourselves. Eat right, drink plenty of water, stretch, exercise and take a few minutes to slow down and reflect on what the season is all about.”

So relax and enjoy the holidays! Dr. Bautch and the ACA encourage you to consider the following tips to help keep you and your loved ones healthy, happy and safe this season.

Treat Holiday Shopping as an Athletic Event
• Wear shoes with plenty of cushioning in the soles to absorb the impact of walking on those hard shopping mall floors.
• Make sure the clothing you wear is as comfortable as possible. It’s a good idea to wear layers, because you may be going from a cold environment (outdoors) to a warm environment (indoors).
• Leave your purse at home. Keep your belongings in a zippered-up coat pocket or in a light backpack, packing only items that are absolutely essential (driver’s license, credit card, etc.)

• Ask for help if you’re purchasing an item that’s heavy, odd-shaped, or hard to reach. Be more patient, ask for help, and don’t try to do it yourself.

“During the holiday season, we’re running at absolute maximum capacity, which can lead to stress and even depression,” says Dr. Bautch. “Why do so many people become depressed around the holidays? Staying active, stretching and staying hydrated can help increase our capacity, to help us deal with the activities of the season.”
Plan Frequent Breaks
During a day of heavy shopping, most people should take a break every 45 minutes. Those who lead a sedentary lifestyle may need to take a break every 20-30 minutes, while those who are physically active may get away with taking less frequent breaks.

• If your mall or shopping center doesn’t offer lockers, try to plan trips to your car where you can drop off excess bags and continue shopping without the extra weight. Don’t carry around more than is absolutely necessary at one time.
• When taking breaks, try to eat light foods. A salad and some fruit is a much better option than a burger and fries.

“We actually need to eat better than normal during the holiday season,” explains Dr. Bautch. “Heart attacks occur more often during the holidays. Eating a heavy meal and then running out on an exhausting shopping trip can be very dangerous.”
Shopping With Children

If at all possible, do not bring children along on a holiday shopping trip. Most children simply do not have the stamina for such an event, and you and your child will only become frustrated with one another. Don’t add this type of stress to an already stressful situation. Instead, try to split up “child duty” with a spouse or another parent. They can watch your kids while you shop, and vice-versa.

“Shopping with children is just a bad idea,” says Dr. Bautch. “If your hands are loaded with shopping bags, you may not be able to hold your child’s hand, which could increase the chances he or she might wander away from you. Take whatever steps necessary to avoid bringing your child along.”
Wrapping Gifts
Since there is no “ideal” position for wrapping gifts, the most important thing to remember is to vary your positions. For example, try standing at a table or countertop for one package, sitting on a bed for another, and sitting in a comfortable chair for another, etc.

Do not wrap packages while sitting on the floor. Wrapping packages while sitting on a hard floor can wreak havoc on your posture, and should be avoided.

And always remember to stretch before and after you wrap gifts. “When wrapping presents, it’s a good idea to ‘stretch the opposites,’” recommends Dr. Bautch. “In other words, if you are leaning forward when wrapping your gifts, stretch backward when you are done.”

Posted in Back, Blog, Chiropractic, Exercise & Fitness, Health, Joints, Pain, Wellness Tips, Winter Health | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Holiday Shopping Tips

The Ultimate Guide To Deskercise

Posted on by Dr.Mike

Fitness isn’t something that can only be achieved at the gym. Every day is an opportunity to focus on your physical fitness and get some much-needed exercise, even when working at your desk. While many employers today have recognized the importance of physical fitness (some even set up gyms and fitness centers within their offices), it can still be challenging to find time for fitness amongst your other responsibilities. Focusing on your work is important for your career, but it can be detrimental to your health in more ways than one. For example, not only can work keep you from maintaining a commitment to regular exercise, but sitting at your desk for extended periods can increase your risk of obesity and cause muscle stiffness.

Fortunately, even though you may be chained to your desk for much of the day, you can still take a few proactive steps to improve your fitness. Staying in shape while on the job doesn’t have to mean pounding a treadmill throughout your entire lunch break. There are many exercises you can do while seated or standing at your desk that will help you fight the negative effects of being sedentary. These exercises can also help prevent some of the more common aches and pains which can affect you when sitting for too long. “Deskercises” can be great ways to keep your body active, without taking you away from your work. They only take a few minutes and you don’t have to worry about breaking a sweat. What’s more, they will help keep your blood moving and your muscles limber. Further, exercising at your desk can help improve your overall mood and well-being during a stressful day. From a simple shoulder shrug to spine stretches that can relieve tension in your back, these easy forms of deskercise can help you feel better throughout the day and provide you with at least a little physical activity when you’re too busy to get to the gym.

In addition to these simple exercises, there are many other ways you can do something good for your physical fitness — even while you’re at the office. Examples include getting up from your desk every hour to take a five-minute walk around the office, and using the stairs instead of the elevator. By following these ideas as well as the deskercise tips in the guide below, you can improve your fitness no matter where you are.

http://www.conceptseating.com/the-ultimate-guide-to-deskercise

Author bio: Joel Vento is President of Sales and Marketing at Concept Seating. Vento brings over 20 years of experience to Concept Seating, leading to the creation of several products — including the 3150 Operator Chair. Concept Seating produces 24-hour dispatch chairs and office task chairs for a variety of industries.

Posted in Back, Blog, Chiropractic, Exercise & Fitness, Health, Joints, Neck, Pain | Tagged , | Comments Off on The Ultimate Guide To Deskercise

Chronic pain caused by lifestyle by Foot Levelers

Posted on by Dr.Mike

·
Pain is not always the result of a particular injury that has occurred during your life. In fact, we could be causing our own chronic pain every day and not realize it.

As defined by the American Chronic Pain Association, chronic pain “…can be described as ongoing or recurrent pain, lasting beyond the usual course of acute illness or injury or more than 3 to 6 months, and which adversely affects the individual’s well-being. A simpler definition for chronic or persistent pain is pain that continues when it should not.”[1]

Certain choices we make in our everyday lives could be the reason why we experience lasting musculoskeletal pain. Below are a few common causes of pain:

Carrying wallets/handbags/briefcases –
Instead of stuffing our pockets, we use these to carry our essentials. But carrying a handbag or briefcase causes us to adjust to the amount of weight being carried on one side. This can strain the lower back and hips, as one shoulder will shift weight to one side of the body. A wallet is another culprit for causing chronic pain. Sitting on a thick wallet in the car, at work, and at home causes one side of the body to be elevated, creating an uneven foundation for the hips and lower back. Sitting on a wallet, the greater the chance of experiencing a pinched nerve, or a herniated disc.

Weight –

Extra weight can impact the body in multiple ways. Added weight around the midsection of the body will offset balance, causing the pelvis to tilt forward, which can strain the spine and lower back. Additional weight upon the feet also causes the muscles, ligaments, and tendons to stretch and become weaker. It is common for overweight men and women to experience collapsed arches, which cause the knees to rotate and disrupt the kinetic chain. Pain becomes an issue when the body begins to carry more weight that it has been designed to carry. Simply adding light exercise and cutting back a few calories during the week can make a big difference.

On the job –

Every job is different and our bodies react inversely to the ergonomics at work. Whether you are standing or sitting all day, our bodies develop a routine and adapt to the positions we frequent the most throughout the day. No matter what the job may be, every body needs restoration of its original range of motion. This can be done by going for a walk in the parking lot on a break or stretching. The bottom line is, take frequent but short breaks to avoid improper posture, lifting techniques, and eyestrain from computer screens. It can also help as a quick energy boost.

Sleep –

Everyone has a pattern of their own – some people need a firm mattress while others need a soft one. But, there are drawbacks to certain ways that we sleep. Stomach and side sleeping may feel comfortable, but are also a main reason why we toss and turn during the night and wake up with pain. As we sleep, our head, neck, and spine need to be supported correctly. Optimal sleep patterns include, sleeping flat on the back with the neck supported by a cervical pillow. These are just a few of many reasons why we have chronic pain from seemingly harmless origins. At least one of the factors above affects your everyday lives. Instead of using temporary painkillers to treat lasting discomfort, talk to your chiropractor – your DC will be able to pinpoint pain, and take steps to treat it at the source.

[1] American Chronic Pain Association. Chronic Pain. Last Updated: 9/18/2012. http://www.theacpa.org/conditionDetail.aspx?id=74

Posted in Blog | Tagged | Comments Off on Chronic pain caused by lifestyle by Foot Levelers

BACK TO SCHOOL IS NEARLY HERE ! TIME TO REVIEW FOR BACKPACK SAFETY.

Posted on by Dr.Mike

Backpack Misuse Leads to Chronic Back Pain, Doctors of Chiropractic Say
Back pain is pervasive among American adults, but a new and disturbing trend is emerging. Young children are suffering from back pain much earlier than previous generations, and the use of overweight backpacks is a contributing factor, according to the American Chiropractic Association (ACA). In fact, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission reports that backpack-related injuries sent more than 7,000 people to the emergency room in 2001 alone.

“In my own practice, I have noticed a marked increase in the number of young children who are complaining about back, neck and shoulder pain,” said Dr. Scott Bautch, a member of the ACA’s Council on Occupational Health. “The first question I ask these patients is, ‘Do you carry a backpack to school?’ Almost always, the answer is ‘yes.'”

This new back pain trend among youngsters isn’t surprising when you consider the disproportionate amounts of weight they carry in their backpacks – often slung over just one shoulder. According to Dr. Bautch, a recent study conducted in Italy found that the average child carries a backpack that would be the equivalent of a 39-pound burden for a 176-pound man, or a 29-pound load for a 132-pound woman. Of those children carrying heavy backpacks to school, 60 percent had experienced back pain as a result.

According to Dr. Bautch, preliminary results of studies being conducted in France show that the longer a child wears a backpack, the longer it takes for a curvature or deformity of the spine to correct itself. “The question that needs to be addressed next is, ‘Does it ever return to normal?'” Dr. Bautch added.

The results of these types of studies are especially important as more and more school districts – many of them in urban areas – remove lockers from the premises, forcing students to carry their books with them all day long.

The problem has become so widespread, in fact, that the California State Assembly passed legislation that would force school districts to develop ways of reducing the weight of students’ backpacks. Similar legislation is being considered in New Jersey as well. The ACA believes that limiting the backpack’s weight to no more than 10 percent of the child’s body weight and urging the use of ergonomically correct backpacks are possible solutions.

What Can You Do?
The ACA offers the following tips to help prevent the needless pain that backpack misuse could cause the students in your household.
• Make sure your child’s backpack weighs no more than 5 to 10 percent of his or her body weight. A heavier backpack will cause your child to bend forward in an attempt to support the weight on his or her back, rather than on the shoulders, by the straps.
• The backpack should never hang more than four inches below the waistline. A backpack that hangs too low increases the weight on the shoulders, causing your child to lean forward when walking.
• A backpack with individualized compartments helps in positioning the contents most effectively. Make sure that pointy or bulky objects are packed away from the area that will rest on your child’s back.
• Bigger is not necessarily better. The more room there is in a backpack, the more your child will carry-and the heavier the backpack will be.
• Urge your child to wear both shoulder straps. Lugging the backpack around by one strap can cause the disproportionate shift of weight to one side, leading to neck and muscle spasms, as well as low-back pain.
• Wide, padded straps are very important. Non-padded straps are uncomfortable, and can dig into your child’s shoulders.
• The shoulder straps should be adjustable so the backpack can be fitted to your child’s body. Straps that are too loose can cause the backpack to dangle uncomfortably and cause spinal misalignment and pain.
• If the backpack is still too heavy, talk to your child’s teacher. Ask if your child could leave the heaviest books at school, and bring home only lighter hand-out materials or workbooks.
• Although the use of rollerpacks – or backpacks on wheels – has become popular in recent years, the ACA is now recommending that they be used cautiously and on a limited basis by only those students who are not physically able to carry a backpack. Some school districts have begun banning the use of rollerpacks because they clutter hallways, resulting in dangerous trips and falls.
Chiropractic Care Can Help…
If you or your child experiences any pain or discomfort resulting from backpack use, call your doctor of chiropractic. Doctors of chiropractic are licensed and trained to diagnose and treat patients of all ages and will use a gentler type of treatment for children. In addition, doctors of chiropractic can also prescribe exercises designed to help children develop strong muscles, along with instruction in good nutrition, posture and sleeping habits.

Posted in Back, Blog, Children, Chiropractic, Health, Joints, Neck, Pain, Sports, Wellness Tips | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on BACK TO SCHOOL IS NEARLY HERE ! TIME TO REVIEW FOR BACKPACK SAFETY.

Chiropractic Associated With Protective Effect in Spinal Health of Medicare Beneficiaries

Posted on by Dr.Mike

Chiropractic services for Medicare beneficiaries (those older than 65 years) with spine conditions may protect against 1-year declines in functional and self-rated health, suggest findings from a recent study funded by NCCIH (formerly NCCAM). Analysis of patient records also showed that in this sample about 35 percent of Medicare beneficiaries with spine conditions used chiropractic services. The study was published in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics.

Researchers from the University of Iowa and Emory University analyzed data from Medicare beneficiaries (older than 65 years) to examine the comparative effects of chiropractic services and medical care on functional decline, self-assessed health, and patient satisfaction among 12,170 person-year observations. Researchers observed that chiropractic services were associated with a significant protective effect against 1-year decline in activities of daily living, lifting, stooping, walking, self-rated health, and worsening health. The findings also indicated that people who use chiropractic services have higher satisfaction with followup care and information provided about their diagnosis.

The researchers noted that future studies should focus on distinguishing among specific types of spine conditions to better determine the effect of chiropractic compared with medical care only on the health and well-being of this population. These findings are based on observational data, and more research is needed to determine if there is any direct, protective benefit on spinal health from chiropractic services for this age group.
Reference

Weigel PA, Hockenberry JM, Wolinsky FD. Chiropractic use in the Medicare population: prevalence, patterns, and associations with 1-year changes in health and satisfaction with care. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics. 2014;37(8):542–551.

Posted in Blog | Tagged , | Comments Off on Chiropractic Associated With Protective Effect in Spinal Health of Medicare Beneficiaries

Treat Your Skin from Inside Out This Summer By Cathy Burke, RYT

Posted on by Dr.Mike

Chiropractic patients care for their health naturally: They visit their chiropractor regularly to improve health and wellness, eat wholesome foods to maintain good digestion and overall health, and do their best to minimize the use of medications. Skin, the largest organ on our bodies, should be no different. While skin changes as we age and every individual is different, everyone can take some simple steps to protect and replenish it. Remember these basic steps to healthy skin:
• Don’t smoke! Smoking accelerates the aging process, contributing to premature aging and wrinkles in the skin.
• Select gentle skin care products with natural ingredients.
• Use a facial sunscreen (with minimum sun protection factor of 15) every day to prevent sun damage to the delicate skin on the face.
• Use sunscreen for areas of the body exposed to the sun for more than 15-20 minutes.
• Drink six to eight 8-oz. glasses of clean, filtered water a day.
• Reduce refined carbohydrates and sugars, which can spike insulin levels and lead to pimples.
• Eat fresh fruits and vegetables to increase your intake of vitamins and minerals.
Ingredients for Healthy Skin While a wholesome diet is a foundation for the healthful skin, some nutrients have been found to aide in skin rejuvenation and protection.
• Vitamins A, E, and C, selenium and flavonoids help fight free radicals that age skin.1 In addition to receiving these nutrients through diet and supplements, you can also apply them topically. Black, green and white teas also provide a high content of antioxidants.
• Coenzyme Q10 has also been shown to fight free radicals and positively impact the health of all cells, including the skin, protecting them from inflammation and premature aging.2
• Omega-3 fatty acids, found in salmon and other oily fish, flax seeds, fish and flax seed oil, and walnuts, are especially helpful in improving skin texture and complexion by maintaining healthy cells and reducing inflammation.3 Cold-pressed oils, such as olive, flaxseed, walnut and fish oils, can help moisturize dry skin. If your skin is excessively oily, it is recommended to limit oily foods.
Common Causes of Skin Problems Many skin conditions are passed down genetically. However, heredity alone does not guarantee that the condition will present. Lifestyle factors such as stress or diet will often draw these pre-disposed conditions to the surface. If you suffer from
• dermatitis—inflamed, itchy skin
• psoriasis—reddish skin covered by white or silvery scales, often itchy
• eczema—itchy, scaly, blistering inflammation of skin or
• acne—pimples, cysts or nodules,
consider visiting a dermatologist and a nutritionist or functional medicine practioner to look for underlying problems such as a food allergy or hormonal imbalance.
• Allergies to foods such as gluten and dairy may present as psoriasis and eczema.4-7 The hormones found in dairy products may sometimes trigger acne.8 An allergy test may be indicated to confirm the allergy. Elimination diets can often help in these cases.
• Stress has been a known trigger for skin conditions. Stress reduction techniques such as yoga, meditation and journaling are great ways to work through stressful situations.
• Some skin conditions are a reaction to a topical allergy or irritation. If you present with minor skin irritations, consider whether you have started using a new laundry detergent, soap, perfume, lotion, cleaner or even fabric in your clothes or furniture. Identifying and removing this new irritant and replacing it with a pure, mild form of the product can often help improve the skin condition.

Posted in Aging, Beauty, Chiropractic, Diet, Exercise & Fitness, Health, Wellness Tips | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Treat Your Skin from Inside Out This Summer By Cathy Burke, RYT

Chiropractic Associated With Protective Effect in Spinal Health of Medicare Beneficiaries

Posted on by Dr.Mike

© Matthew Lester

Chiropractic services for Medicare beneficiaries (those older than 65 years) with spine conditions may protect against 1-year declines in functional and self-rated health, suggest findings from a recent study funded by NCCIH (formerly NCCAM). Analysis of patient records also showed that in this sample about 35 percent of Medicare beneficiaries with spine conditions used chiropractic services. The study was published in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics.

Researchers from the University of Iowa and Emory University analyzed data from Medicare beneficiaries (older than 65 years) to examine the comparative effects of chiropractic services and medical care on functional decline, self-assessed health, and patient satisfaction among 12,170 person-year observations. Researchers observed that chiropractic services were associated with a significant protective effect against 1-year decline in activities of daily living, lifting, stooping, walking, self-rated health, and worsening health. The findings also indicated that people who use chiropractic services have higher satisfaction with followup care and information provided about their diagnosis.

The researchers noted that future studies should focus on distinguishing among specific types of spine conditions to better determine the effect of chiropractic compared with medical care only on the health and well-being of this population. These findings are based on observational data, and more research is needed to determine if there is any direct, protective benefit on spinal health from chiropractic services for this age group.
Reference

Weigel PA, Hockenberry JM, Wolinsky FD. Chiropractic use in the Medicare population: prevalence, patterns, and associations with 1-year changes in health and satisfaction with care. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics. 2014;37(8):542–551.

Additional Resources

Spinal Manipulation and Pain
NCCIH Videolecture: Manipulating the Pain: Chiropractic and Other “Alternative” Treatments for Back Pain

Posted in Blog | Comments Off on Chiropractic Associated With Protective Effect in Spinal Health of Medicare Beneficiaries ← Older posts